Since I already posted a review this week for the Reclaiming Shilo Snow Book Tour and Scavenger Hunt, I’m going to do something a little fun on this February Friday. Jameson  @ Lovely Whatsoevers nominated me for the Bibliophile Sweater Tag. (Thank you!) It sounded like a lot of fun, so here we go!

Rules

1.) Give the person who tagged you a never-ending supply of cookies (or just thank them—either works).
2.) Answer all the questions and use the blog graphic for this tag somewhere in your post.
3.) Pass along the tag to at least five other people to wear a sweater.

Tags

Fuzzy sweater
(a book that is the epitome of comfort)

Winnie the Pooh

Nothing says comfort quite like a stuffed teddy bear. While Winnie-the-Pooh is much more than a teddy bear, I think the 100 Acre Wood gang and their adventures fits perfectly with that fuzzy sweater vibe.

Striped sweater
(book which you devoured every line of)

Strange the Dreamer Blog Edit

Strange the Dreamer is so beautiful that I think Laini Taylor secretly sold her soul to a demon in exchange for her writing ability. I definitely soaked up this book simply from the gorgeous prose, not to mention the characters and world-building and plot.

Ugly Christmas sweater
(book with a weird cover)

The Last Namsara (1)

As much as I love The Last Namsara, I find the cover super weird. I mean, the knife and the golden flecks are badass, but the up-close shot of the lips is… awkward.

Cashmere sweater
(most expensive book you’ve bought)

Lavishly Illustrated Blog Edit

Not counting books I’ve had to buy for college (which were definitely not worth the price I paid for some), these three lavishly illustrated classics are the most expensive books I’ve bought (and even then, they aren’t a ridiculous price for the beautiful, color illustrations and gorgeous covers). The Peter Pan edition is still my favorite of the three.

Hoodie
(favorite classic book)

The Hobbit Blog Edit

Without a doubt, The Hobbit by J.R.R. Tolkien will forever be my favorite classic and favorite book (if, you know, I have to choose a favorite). I related to Bilbo Baggins so much and the whole adventure plus a dragon and all the important truths about life held within these pages have become a part of who I am as a person.

Cardigan
(book that you bought on impulse)

The Disappearances Blog Edit

The Disappearances by Emily Bain Murphy was my favorite book from 2017, so when I learned the UK paperback copy was available from Book Depository for under $10, I had to get it. I absolutely love both covers for different reasons, but that paperback (on the right) is definitely an impulse buy. But it’s an impulse buy I’m glad I made.

Turtleneck sweater
(book from your childhood)

Where the Wild Things Are Blog Edit

There are a lot of books I could have picked for this. I even debated between so many books before finally settling with Where the Wild Things Are. It’s a classic picture book by a beloved author with a lot of fun shenanigans and of course, monstrous creatures.

Homemade knitted sweater
(book that is Indie-published)

Geekerella

It’s actually a lot harder to determine if a book is indie published than I thought it would be. There are so many different terms and definitions for what is considered indie vs. self-published vs. traditional. But I saw Geekerella by Ashley Poston on a indie list, so I’m counting it as an indie book. And a wonderful indie book at that!

V-neck sweater
(book that did not meet your expectations)

Warbringer 1

Wonder Woman: Warbringer was one of my most anticipated reads for 2017 but it turned out to be my least favorite read of 2017. While there were a few things I enjoyed about the book (mainly kick-butt ladies), a lot of it fell flat for me and was boring or didn’t quite make sense. I felt like the story wasn’t allowed to breathe and that Leigh Bardugo wasn’t allowed to make it her own.

Argyle sweater
(book with a unique format)

The Arsonist (1)

The Arsonist by Stephanie Oakes is a strange, complicated book that is told through several unique point of views. From school essay assignments to letters to diary entries, this book weaves an interesting mystery that had me screaming by the end of the book.

Polka dot sweater
(a book with well-rounded characters)
Lies of Locke Lamora Blog Edit

The Lies of Locke Lamora, despite being 720ish pages, has a lot of good elements going for it. The setting is well-built, the plot is thrilling, and the writing is stellar. But above all, the characters are what seal the deal for me with this book. If the main group wasn’t so well-rounded and interesting, I think this book would suffer. Fortunately, Scott Lynch has a gift for breathing life into his characters.

Nominees

Kristen @Coffee and Literary Rage

Kelly @A Pre-Posed Adventure

Sky @Further Up and Further In

Nicole @Book-Wyrm-Knits

Anybody else who wants to do it!
(Please, let me know if you do, though. I’d love to read your responses.)

The Questions

Fuzzy sweater (a book that is the epitome of comfort)
Striped sweater (book which you devoured every line of)
Ugly Christmas sweater (book with a weird cover)
Cashmere sweater (most expensive book you’ve bought)
Hoodie (favorite classic book)
Cardigan (book that you bought on impulse)
Turtleneck sweater (book from your childhood)
Homemade knitted sweater (book that is Indie-published)
V-neck sweater (book that did not meet your expectations)
Argyle sweater (book with a unique format)
Polka dot sweater (a book with well-rounded characters)

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